Monday, April 9, 2012

Pulp Fly.

Fly fishing is about characters. The ones we play, the ones we meet, the ones we want to be. It makes stories somehow, because it (unlike any other thing I’ve experienced), weaves itself into the fabric of self…into our friendships, marriages, homes, and mental stability. Thus our struggles, hopes, dreams -- and yes, our dramatic failures -- can all be told through its guise.

Pulp Fly, a new Kindle e-book (and if you don’t have a Kindle, you can download a free application to read it on your PC or Mac here), is a collection of just such characters and stories by the contributing writers of Ralph Bartholdt, Alex Cerveniak, Matt Dun, Davin Ebanks, Michael GracieAlex Landeen, Pete McDonald, Matt Smythe, Bruce Smithhammer, Bjorn Stromsness, Bob White, and with an introduction by Kirk Deeter.

This is a collection of characters in the true sense of the word – the features and traits, aggregate in one physical body. The sum of parts. And in Pulp Fly, you’ll meet such characters as self medicated Frank and a storied presidential library dedication; and you'll meet Jakob and his long sought brown trout; and also, his regret. You’ll be introduced to a new definition of grand slam and to yourself as a bug through a series of stages in life, slowly metamorphosizing into something beautiful (yet left with some ugly parts from where it’s been), there at the end. Right before you die (and there’s the rub if it, eh?). 

There is a young woman named Leah who finds healing through an old fly box and old man. And there’s the barracuda harbinger for a marriage. 

You’ll be told the story of old friends and Clyde, Ohio -- and about growing up and out of them both. And if you’re like me, you’re imagination will illustrate the man scrimping for change (like we all do, there among the lint and lists and pencils in our pockets), and the one who has a beard “advertising” him as a radical. 

I can picture it. I can picture them. These characters (that beard) – living and breathing in this compilation. I can picture the animal heart in me as I read on -- the one who pushes on, hunting…long after I’ve lost the smell. I can feel the ancient lust for the domination of that which holds our respect.  

In reading, you will be haunted by an Iraq War vet and the power of one cast back, and out of sight; even, if never out of mind. 

And will be left speechless by the end, at two men…outliving life.  

These characters, they are all mirrors. Reflections. And the stories in Pulp Fly do as all good ones should, they tell us a little something about ourselves. 

So go

Read on.  

Meet yourself.  

38 comments:

  1. I still know so little about fly fishing, but your description here made me want to move to a little stream somewhere and learn--if not through actual experience--through words.

    Thanks for the recommendation!

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    1. Emily - I think you're exactly the sort of person who would adore fly fishing....it and words just go together. :)

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  2. Thanks for the great write-up, Erin. Glad it said something to you.

    By the way, there's going to be a Volume 2 in the works soon that will need writing to fill its pages...just sayin'

    ")

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    1. Matt - Any time! I loved the stories, all of them. Fresh. Hip even, you might say. ;) And keep me in the loop!

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  3. Always eloquent, and always spot-on. I have to read it since a couple of my friends are in this one, but thanks for putting it on the must-read list. JT

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    1. JT - Have to or not, it's certainly worth your time. Hope you enjoy the essays as much as I did.

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  4. Although I don't know if I want to know myself through any characters in the book, I'll give it try on your recommendation.

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    1. Howard - Ah, keep an open mind, old man. ;)

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  5. Still looking to find the time. Any carp stuff in there Erin? I will get around to it if not, will get around to it shortly if so. I would certainly hope so given the cast of charachters!

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    1. Trevor - Right? Time...that eternal elusive thing it is. But for sure, put it on your "list" to read.

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    2. Yeah, stupid move. Made the blogger profile switch to Google+ and now McTage has to be Trevor. Very annoying.

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  6. Goodness. If I ever write a book, I want you to do the Forward, or the Introduction, or maybe you can write a few of the stories. Hell, do the whole book. I'll love it.

    You've made a sale here, Erin. Well done.

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    1. Mike - Well gee whiz...thanks! You have to find the publisher though! ;-) Although I consider myself a horrible salesman, I'm very glad you're going to check it out. You won't be disappointed.

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  7. Sounds good. My only question is why on earth are you not one of the authors?

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    1. Tim - Hope you check it out...the authors will not disappoint you!

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  8. I love stuff like this..thanks for the headsup e.m.b.!

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    1. penbayman - Nice! Glad to spread the word.

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  9. Looks like one I just might appreciate , definitely have to check it out. Just have to steal the wife's Kindle one evening!!

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    1. HighPlainsFlyFisher - I know! I downloaded the application and read it on my Mac. But it kind of made me want to get a Kindle. :)
      Hope you enjoy it!

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  10. Thank you for your thoughtful review of the project. Even excluding the rest of the review that follows, the first graf explains the "why" dead on.

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    1. fishingjones - It's a great project! And I was more than happy to let others know that too.

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  11. Sounds like a book well worth reading. Can't relax to enjoy a good book right now since we're packing up our things (among them piles of books) to move but maybe later when I feel more settled. Thanks for sharing!
    Have fun writing,
    M.O.

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    1. M.O. - It's definitely worth it! Good luck with the move, and hope you can check it out later!

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    2. Thanks! I'll keep it in mind be sure of that.
      M.O.

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  12. For some reason I can go to a blog, read a post and leave. I don't feel I need to read on if I don't feel like it. Another post will go up eventually and I'll go read that and leave again. Blog after endless blog.

    With an online book or magazine, and there are plenty of online books and magazines now, I can't read them the same way. With books and magazines I want to read a story or two, stop, slip in a book mark and set it aside till I feel like picking it up again where I left off.

    I can't seem to get used to doing that when reading on screen. I have no doubt it has to do with my age and voracious book reading habits when I was younger. I like ink on paper and how it feels in my hands.

    Hopefully they'll get it printed. I already read and appreciate many of them. I can't find the link, but there's a print on demand book publisher out there somewhere. I'd pay the few extra bucks.

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    1. Ken G - It's a different form of reading, to be sure. I noticed after I graduated with my masters, that I only had the attention span for poetry. (reading too many long research papers). But, I've trained myself to read long pieces again. We just need to adjust to it, but like you said, there's still just something about the feel and smell of paper books...

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    2. List 3 things in an email and want a reply to all of them. Put the most important last. Chances are it will get ignored. A study done a long time ago. People's attention dwindles rapidly with words on screen.

      I used to do art restoration in another life, specializing in works on paper. I like the tactile aspects of it all. Some papers have a feel, one that makes you keep sliding your fingers across it. Paper, with care, lasts a long time. I shut down my computer and I'm always concerned that's it, it's dead, all is gone.

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    3. Ken G. - I hear you on that. I always worry about email actually getting to an inbox, and the documents I have saved not disappearing. But then again, my grandmother always worries about post mail getting where it should. She'll only use one mailbox that she knows works. So I suppose these things are timeless, only different manifestations.

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  13. The forward on Amazon looks promising, will it not be published in print form? Like a previous comment, I prefer to hold paper in hand. All my kids and g'kids have Kindles or the equivalent, but I'm doubtful I'll make the switch.
    Years ago, a painter/angler/writer named Russell Chatham wrote a similar book, "Dark Waters"....his first review/rejection was from a NY publisher, who complained that these stories had "sex, food and drugs" in them. The first story, "The Great Duck Misunderstanding" is my favorite short story ever.
    Thanks for bringing this to my notice, Erin. Perhaps I'll muddle through the loading of the application.
    Mike

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    1. Mike - The application is very easy to navigate (I speak as one not good with such things!)...and I do hope you check it out. I think you'd like the style of essay very much. As for print? I do not know. But I do think Bruce Smithhammer gives an excellent explanation of "Pulp" fly in the introduction. Thanks for stopping by....hope the Montana spring is treating you well!

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  14. @Should Fish More, I just tried to buy "Dark Waters" on my Kindle. It's not available but they do have a "new" paperback edition on sale for $291.30

    May have to go used in this case.

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  15. Pete
    Good grief, it's good but not maybe 291$ good. It's been out of print for some time; a couple years ago Chatham was here in town (before he went broke and moved to the bay area) and he signed mine, saying it was the first one he'd seen in some years.

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  16. Such an apt statement in describing how this silly hobby can become such a driving force in our lives. Recently I noticed that most of the new friends that I have made since I started fly fishing have been into fly fishing too. The same with my vacation time and what little free money I have. It's crazy! JGR

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    1. JGR - It's this wonderfully enabling cyclical thing, isn't it. :) Glad it's not just me...and thanks for stopping by!

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  17. It's all about the characters you meet along the way....the stories are a fortunate side affect of the pursuit. I'll make sure to check this out...looks like a pretty good cast.

    ..nice write up by the way. I'm with Mike.

    Cheers

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    1. Sanders - Stories as "fortunate side effects"...exactly. Thanks for stopping by. Hope your home owning projects are going well. I'm currently sitting amongst piles of pine 1x4x8's. With sawdust everywhere. Thanks for the kind words, as always...and cheers back to you.

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  18. Erin, you saved the day. Glasses raised and hats off.
    Alan.

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    1. Alan - I'm very glad you enjoyed it...and cheers back to you...

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